I am yet to meet anyone who would tell me they don’t like a good gravy, which is why I’ve decided to share my basic gravy recipe with you.

Ingredients:

Roasting tray

After you have removed the roast you definitely do not want all the fat in the roasting tray, so you can throw away most of it. Leave a little there with all the juices and remaining sediment.

  • 4 tbsp flour
  • 450-500ml/2 cups stock

Or

Frying pan

The fry pan is different, you will most likely need all that is there. Once you have removed the meat (from the frying pan):

  • 2 tbsp flour
  • 200–250ml/1 cup stock

Note: The above are estimates and depend on the size of roasting tray and frying pan.

Method

  1. When the meat is cooked and resting, this is the perfect time to make the gravy. The meat is now removed from the roasting tray or frying pan and placed in a separate bowl or plate to rest.

If your meat has been roasting on a low heat, there should not be too much burnt sediment. If there is, gently remove and throw out. Put the tray on the stove. If the tray is quite large, then place it across several stove burners on moderate to high heat. If using a frying pan, it can sit directly over one hot flame.

  1. You will see that what is left in the tray or fry pan is reducing, thickening, darkening in colour and becoming flavourful, all at the same time.
  2. Reduce the heat and add the flour. Stir thoroughly with a whisk for approx 1 minute.
  3. Turn the heat up to high and add some stock (about ⅓). Whisk and bring to the boil and thicken. Repeat twice with the remaining stock. Let simmer for a few minutes to thicken and develop colour and flavour.
  4. Below is optional (if you have the time) to ensure a lump-free result. Pass the gravy through a strainer into another pot. Season to taste.
  5. Add any juices from the bowl/plate where the meat is resting. Place on a low heat just before needed and stir to combine the extra juices and the seasoning.

Serve with your meat.

This is your basic gravy and it is all about making use of the flavourful leftovers in the roasting tray or frying pan.

Your Meat Mate explains this and a whole lot more!